DepEd Guidelines on Class Suspension during Storm

The Department of Education has called on the public, especially parents, to use as a guide the existing policies on suspension on classes during bad weather conditions in order to keep children out of harm.

Based on to DepEd Order No. 28, series of 2005, classes in all public and private elementary and secondary schools are automatically suspended or cancelled without having to wait for announcement under the following circumstances:
  • When Signal No. 1 is raised by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical & Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA), classes at the preschool level shall be automatically suspended in all public and private schools.
  • When Signal No. 2 is raised, classes at the preschool, elementary, and secondary levels shall be automatically suspended in all public and private schools.
  • When Signal No. 3 is raised, classes in all levels are automatically suspended.
In view of this, DepEd has requested PAG-ASA to reiterate these guidelines when issuing regular weather bulletins so that the public can be duly informed and be better prepared.

In the absence of storm signals, localized suspension is allowed by the DepEd. The decision may be made by the school principal, division superintendent, or local government executive.

Secretary Armin Luistro reiterated that the parents, the local executives, and the local DepEd officials are in the best position to decide if they will send their children to school when storm signals are announced by PAGASA in specific areas.

Existing policies allow local DepEd officials and local government executives to suspend classes at their level to avoid leaving children on the streets when heavy rains and strong winds hit certain areas.

“The final decision to let the child go to school or not is left with the parents. Local suspension and parental decision are allowed since parents and officials on the ground have a better idea about the situation in their areas,” explained Luistro.

DepEd has also furnished media outfits with the guidelines, which they can use to reiterate to the public during inclement weather.